Daughters of the Lake: My Thoughts

Brief synopsis:

Kate Granger has the perfect life. She has her dream job and her dream husband all the while being an heiress.

This all changes when she begins having strange dreams about a mysterious young woman and also finds that her husband is having an affair. She runs home to mom and dad to regroup and is shocked when a young woman’s body is washed up on the shore by her parents’ house. Nobody can figure out who the woman is but Kate recognizes her as the woman from her dreams. Now it is up to Kate to figure out what happened to this woman as she rebuilds her own life.

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this book enough that I kept reading even when I was thinking “REALLY?!”. The main character was as relatable as an attractive Caucasian heiress with a home on Lake Superior and free access to a quaint Bed and Breakfast and Open Bar can be to me. That being said, I actually did like her and did relate to her struggles. The book is technically a ghost story and I enjoyed the melancholy aspect of it. I enjoyed how the dreams were incorporated and how the book switched between the past and present. The actual writing was ok. Not too descriptive that I learned how the different shades of red on a flower made a character feel and not completely lacking in description either.

The plot was interesting if a little far fetched (but hey it’s a ghost story so I guess that’s ok) and there were a handful of very likeable characters. HOWEVER, there was so much in this book that was a little too good to be true. There does end up being a slight love interest in the book but it strikes me as being too good to be true. The utterly freaking perfect gay guy confidante who happens to be on hand and gives Kate access to open bar at his beautiful bed and breakfast all the while gushing over her was wayyyy too perfect. I found myself wishing he was my best friend and I really enjoyed his character but man if it wasn’t hard to believe.

The ending was a little… much… but again it’s a ghost story so ok. As far as the supernatural is concerned, there are a couple of spooky moments but nothing really scary so I would not consider this horror or even hardcore suspense. I would recommend this book to anyone who’d be interested in a light gothic read.

All in all I enjoyed it and give it 3/5 stars ⭐️ ⭐️⭐️

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The Classics Club 50 Question Survey

1 Share a link to your club list.

My list.

2 When did you join The Classics Club? How many titles have you read for the club? (We are SO CHECKING UP ON YOU! Nah. We’re just asking.) 

August 2017 and I have read 17 so far.

3 What are you currently reading?

Wuthering Heights

4 What did you just finish reading and what did you think of it?

Just reread Dracula and loved it just as much as before.

5 What are you reading next? Why?

Brave New World.  I’m in a dystopian kind of a mood and I always hear about this book in conjunction with 1984 so we will see.

6 Best book you’ve read so far with the club, and why?

I’d say it’s a toss up between North and South and Dracula.

7 Book you most anticipate (or, anticipated) on your club list?

Anything by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

8 Book on your club list you’ve been avoiding, if any? Why?

Moby Dick. Because I just can’t. I have started this book three or four times and have always ended with me quietly closing the book and placing it back on the shelf.

9 First classic you ever read?

And Then There were None.

10 Toughest classic you ever read?

I had a hard time with Villette because it felt long and I couldn’t identify with any of the characters.

11 Classic that inspired you? or scared you? made you cry? made you angry?

Madame Bovary made me angry and though I understood her frustration a little, I wanted to smack her around a little.

12 Longest classic you’ve read? Longest classic left on your club list?

War and Peace is probably the longest and The Tale of Genji is probably the biggest I haven’t read yet.

13 Oldest classic you’ve read? Oldest classic left on your club list?

Utopia is the oldest I’ve read to completion but I have read parts of works by Plato and other Greek works.

14 Favorite biography about a classic author you’ve read — or, the biography on a classic author you most want to read, if any?

My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass. I was blown away.  It read like a fiction novel rather than an autobiography.  It was excellent.

15 Which classic do you think EVERYONE should read? Why?

1984.  Really makes you think about what it would take to get to that point.

16 Favorite edition of a classic you own, if any?

I own a beautiful copy of The Tale of Genji, the collected works of Jane Austen, and my pop up version of Alice in Wonderland.

17 Favorite movie adaption of a classic?

The most recent adaptation of And Then There Were None.

18 Classic which hasn’t been adapted yet (that you know of) which you very much wish would be adapted to film.

The Shuttle.

19 Least favorite classic? Why?

So far, I’d have to say The Dumbhouse.  I get the whole trying to make you think, but I have a hard time reading about cruelty to children or animals and this one had both.

20 Name five authors you haven’t read yet whom you cannot wait to read.

Lady Muraski

Edith Hamilton

Emily Bronte (currently reading)

21 Which title by one of the five you’ve listed above most excites you and why?

I’m excited to finish Wuthering Heights because I wasn’t enjoying it at first but I’m starting to really enjoy it and I have heard about this book for years.

22 Have you read a classic you disliked on first read that you tried again and respected, appreciated, or even ended up loving? (This could be with the club or before it.)

Pride and Prejudice. I was not as familiar with the culture and language when I first read it and now I love it and frequently read regency and Victorian literature.

23 Which classic character can’t you get out of your head?

Frankenstein’s monster.

24 Which classic character most reminds you of yourself?

I really identified with Anna Karenina when my first marriage failed.

25 Which classic character do you most wish you could be like?

26 Which classic character reminds you of your best friend?

Merry from Lord of the Rings. She’s cheerful and carefree.

27 If a sudden announcement was made that 500 more pages had been discovered after the original “THE END” on a classic title you read and loved, which title would you most want to keep reading? Or, would you avoid the augmented manuscript in favor of the original? Why?

Lord of the Rings. Hands down.

28 Favorite children’s classic?

ANYTHING by Frances Hodgson Burnett.  I loooooove all of her children’s lit.

29 Who recommended your first classic?

Nobody really.  I just wanted to read more difficult books and picked up Pride and Prejudice when they released one of the movie adaptations.

30 Whose advice do you always take when it comes to literature. (Recommends the right editions, suggests great titles, etc.)

There are a few people on Booktube who I tend to listen to because they have similar tastes as me.

31 Favorite memory with a classic?

Relaxing with my newborn in my arms and reading through all the Frances Hodgson Burnett children’s classics.

32 Classic author you’ve read the most works by?

Agatha Christie, Frances Hodgson Burnett, and Jane Austen.

33 Classic author who has the most works on your club list?

Probably Frances Hodgson Burnett.

34 Classic author you own the most books by?

Agatha Christie.  See my Agatha Christie Collection.

35 Classic title(s) that didn’t make it to your club list that you wish you’d included? (Or, since many people edit their lists as they go, which titles have you added since initially posting your club list?) 

I added My Cousin Rachel because I found a copy of it and wanted to read it.

36 If you could explore one author’s literary career from first publication to last — meaning you have never read this author and want to explore him or her by reading what s/he wrote in order of publication — who would you explore? Obviously this should be an author you haven’t yet read, since you can’t do this experiment on an author you’re already familiar with.  Or, which author’s work you are familiar with might it have been fun to approach this way?

I am sort of doing this right now with the Project Poirot that I’m participating in.  Reading all of her Poirot books in order.  It has been interesting to see how Christie’s handling of characters and plot progresses.

37 How many rereads are on your club list? If none, why? If some, which are you most looking forward to, or did you most enjoy?

There are four re reads on my list. I have already re read Dracula but I am very excited to re read Persuasion and War and Peace.

38 Has there been a classic title you simply could not finish?

Moby Dick has been like this for me but I intend to get through it before this challenge is over.

39 Has there been a classic title you expected to dislike and ended up loving?

Dracula. With all the cheesy movie adaptations I expected the worst and it ended up being one of my all time faves.

40 Five things you’re looking forward to next year in classic literature?

Reading more nonfiction and translations from eastern literature.

41 Classic you are DEFINITELY GOING TO MAKE HAPPEN next year?

Mythology by Edith Hamilton.

42 Classic you are NOT GOING TO MAKE HAPPEN next year?

This one depends on my mood.

43 Favorite thing about being a member of the Classics Club?

Finding titles I’ve never heard of and sharing a love of classic literature.

44 List five fellow clubbers whose blogs you frequent. What makes you love their blogs?

I will have to come back to this question later because I haven’t really come across many.

45 Favorite post you’ve read by a fellow clubber? See above.

46 If you’ve ever participated in a readalong on a classic, tell about the experience? If you’ve participated in more than one, what’s the very best experience? the best title you’ve completed? a fond memory? a good friend made?

I began a readalong of Crime and Punishment with my cousin and it didn’t work out the way I’d like because he didn’t read at the same pace as I did and it wasn’t a priority the way it was for me.  We ended up finally having a little discussion about it long after I had finished the book.

47 If you could appeal for a readalong with others for any classic title, which title would you name? Why?

Moby Dick so I have to finish and because other people’s thoughts might help me to see the book from a different perspective and be more inclined to finish.

48 How long have you been reading classic literature?

Off and on since I was 13.

49 Share up to five posts you’ve written that tell a bit about your reading story. Reviews, journal entries, posts on novels you loved or didn’t love, lists, etc.

War of the Worlds: My thoughts

Messy bookshelves

A Dr Seuss birthday

You force your toddler to read?? In which Nicky rants… just a bit.

Back to the Classics 2018

50 Question you wish was on this questionnaire? (Ask and answer it!)

How has Reading classics affected your life?

I think I am more aware of the world around me. When I’m in certain situations, I might think “wow, this is just like in insert book title here!” I feel like I have a better appreciation for different human natures and let’s face it, my vocabulary is fabulous now. 😉

Messy bookshelves

It’s Shelfie Sunday and I thought I would start off this series with a topic I’ve been thinking about for a few days now.

While scrolling through Bookstagram recently, it hit me that while I may LOVE gazing lovingly at my bookshelves, they look nothing like those beautiful every-book-the-same-size rainbow organized shelves I see.

Sure I own some pop funkos and flowers that I display and I love decorating them for the holidays. And sure, I have some beautiful editions of books. But I display them alongside my well loved paperbacks and mismatched series. But I’ve also run out of room so I double stack my books wherever they fit. My organization makes sense only to me and now that I’ve resorted to double stacking, my books are less “organized” and more… let’s say (air quotes) “haphazardly arranged wherever the f they fit.” I’m in the market for a new shelf so I will be rearranging them back into a more cohesive system soon, but as of right now, we are stuffing books everywhere.

I get a lot of pleasure out of scrolling through bookstagram but I get the same pleasure out of walking around a library or a musty smelling used book store and just looking around. The same pleasure I get from my own shelves. I just love books and anytime there’s a stack of them somewhere, I look and I admire.

So despite my tacky arrangement of pop funkos, anime characters, and random memorabilia I’ve collected while traveling the world, I can honestly say that I believe my shelves have a lot of character. My shelves may not conform to the modern ideal of sleek shelves full of perfectly placed decor and hardback books, but they are beautiful to me and more importantly, they are full of friends both old and new, books I love. ❤️❤️

*As an afterthought I’d like to say that I just discovered the #messybooks posts on bookstagram and I’m in love*

So does anyone else suffer from messy books syndrome?

War of the Worlds: My thoughts

I have been wanting to read this book for so long, but after I read The Time Machine, I found that I wasn’t really eager to pick it up anymore.  I put this book on both my Classics Club Challenge list and my Back to the Classics list and finally picked it up last month when I was trying to recover from a book hangover. I wasn’t sure if I’d finish it as I was a bit bored by The Time Machine, but I needn’t have worried because this book sucked me right in.

war of the worlds

 

A brief synopsis:

It is the end of the 19th century and a series of explosions on Mars is seen from an observatory in England.  Scientists are intrigued, but shortly after this, what appears to be a meteor lands in England.  The meteor turns out to be a landing pod which contains Martians.  Several men approach, waving white flags to signify peace, but are quickly incinerated by a strange Martian weapon.  What follows is utter chaos as the Martians begin their invasion of earth.

It wasn’t until the end of the book that I realized that the narrator was unnamed, but I found him to be a very likeable character. He never claims to be a hero and I was rooting for him the entire time. The narrator has a series of narrow escapes and I found it utterly freaking fascinating as he describes the breakdown of society and the mass panic that follows the invasion.

I tend to like books and the writing style from this era, but I think even those who aren’t very accustomed to this particular writing style will find it enjoyable in this book.  The story moves along pretty quickly and the writing is never an obstacle toward enjoying the book.  A Sci-fi book written in the 19th century might be expected to be a little “cheezy” (for lack of a better word) but I honestly found the book to be very suspenseful and no more “cheezy” or hard to swallow than any of the modern movie adaptations (In fact, I don’t think a single movie adaptation has done this book justice). This was definitely a page turner for me, but it also gave me a lot to think about when the narrator described society’s breakdown so clearly.

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Working in an industrial environment as I do, a cheap paperback edition was perfect for reading on breaks.

I highly recommend this book to anyone and I think this book would be a perfect choice for someone who wants to read more classic literature but is intimidated by massive tomes of literature written in archaic language.  5/5 stars for me.

Thanks for joining me today! Happy reading!

 

A mid year recap of my least favorite books this year

Now that we are officially halfway through the year, I was thinking back over all the books I’ve read so far and there a few that I have very strong feelings about so I thought I’d share what some of my favorites and not so favorite books are. Part 1 is dedicated to my least favorite books and Part 2 is dedicated to my favorite books so far in 2018.

Let us begin with the Books I didn’t enjoy so much in the first half of 2018:

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I was a little let down by this book and I’m not quite sure why.  I had such high hopes for it because it was a multi generational historical fiction book with what I guess would be considered magical realism and/or supernatural elements.  It’s not a bad book and the writing was good, I guess I was just expecting more.

 

 

city of brass

This is another book I had high hopes for.  After reading The Golem and the Jinni I was super excited when I heard about this book on the All the Books podcast and ran and picked it up immediately.  I was severely let down by this one. The concept of this book was fascinating but I found most of the dialogue to be very juvenile (which is perfectly awesome when I’m expecting it) and though it was marketed as an adult book, I found that it felt much more like a YA novel.  I have nothing against YA and enjoy reading YA books WHEN I AM IN THE MOOD FOR THEM. But this had a lot of what my 11 year old would call “cringe-y” dialogue and plot.  I found the whole thing to be a little cheezy and overdone.  I really wanted to like this but I doubt I’ll read the next one.

 

abc murders

*Sigh* I hate to add this one to my non fave list because I feel like I am betraying my queen.  I am a definite Agatha Christie lover and have been doing a read through challenge of the Poirot books, but this one is not my cup of tea.  Part of why I love reading Agatha Christie is because of the cozy yet clever mysteries presented in her books and this one felt a little too much.  It was a little over the top for me.

 

villette

People aren’t kidding when they say this isn’t Jane Eyre.  Aside from the obvious “well duh, it’s a completely different book” it really is different.  I did not hate this book and I mostly enjoyed it because it still had that element of melancholy throughout, but I found it very slow to start and the ending was like getting hit by a bus.  I immediately said “WHATTTT????!!!!” and went online to see if I had interpreted it correctly.  I had, and I was very taken aback by this book’s ending.  Still worth the read though.

 

So that is all for my least favorite books this year.  Please let me know if you love or hate any of these books.  Maybe I am missing something! Stay tuned for my favorite books so far in 2018.

 

 

Annotating books: yay or nay?

If you are of the opinion that nothing should mar the pages of your precious books (and that’s a totally understandable point of view), than I would quit reading right now because some of these photos might upset you.

I re entered college a couple years ago and things are a lot different this time around. I have a very full time job, a husband and two kids. It wasn’t as easy to breeze through as it was when I was 18. Majoring in history, I have to keep track of tons and tons of names, dates, and places. I love to keep concise notes but I wanted to get more out of my text books. Because of my profession, I sometimes get grants for free ebook versions of my textbooks (which is great and many people wish for) but I missed the ease of flipping back and forth through paper pages, so I started buying the paper copies and started writing and marking the hell out of my textbooks. I began to get so much more out of my textbooks this way. My Historiography textbook is a good example of this and I am able to flip back through it for advice when working on a history paper.

 

 

Back in August when I started my Classics Book Club Challenge, I challenged myself to read many books that had frightened me in the past. I wanted to immerse myself in them and get all I could from the texts. So I thought to myself that if marking my textbooks was working so well, why not begin to mark my books as well? So that’s what I did. It has been going wonderfully so far. Over the last few months I have been honing my system so it has changed considerably from just post it notes and marking with asterisks. I now loosely color code things with highlighter and pen and take notes in my reading journal. I also still use plenty of post its to tab the books. Usually I will highlight or underline key characters’ first appearance in blue while highlighting pretty passages in pink. A good example of my more recent refined system can be seen here in my copy of The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien which I am currently re reading. I thought it would be fitting to include this book as tomorrow March 25 is Tolkien Read Day.

Annotating in this way has helped me remember so many more of the names and places in Tolkien’s universe and it has worked nicely helping me know what to look for in my companion books The Heroes of Tolkien and The Guide to Tolkien’s World: A Bestiary, both by David Day. (It has not escaped me that not only am I a real life history dork, but I am also a fictional history dork 😉)

But while I am all about annotating books, I haven’t yet started marking up my pretty collectible copies of certain books.

I know a lot of people think it an evil sin to mark their books but I also know there’s a lot of you out there who DO mark their books. So I’m curious to see how many of you out there mark your books and how do you go about doing so? I like where I am now compared to a few months ago but I would be glad of any new tips. So let me know if you’re a marker or not! 🙂

See you next time!