Creepy (but not too creepy) books for fall…the classics

Greetings fellow readers! I am beyond excited we recently said goodbye to summer and hello to fall. Even though I typically veer towards gothic reads, I am still a mood reader but fall always tends to put me in an even more gothic mood than usual so I find myself reading a lot of more melancholy books this time of year. So today I thought I’d discuss some books that are creepy enough for this time of year but are considered classic literature.  Being the fan of Gothic fiction that I am, this is right up my alley and I had a lot of fun coming up with classic titles that embody the eery atmosphere that we all like to come across in books during this time of year.

1. Dracula by Bram Stoker

I love the format of this book and it remains one of my favorite books of all time.

2. Jamaica Inn by Daphne Du Maurier

Melancholy and full of suspense. The setting and the suspense make this story a great fall read.

3. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

I have a love/hate relationship with this one. Dr. Frankenstein is a character I want to reach through the pages and shake some sense into but it is fascinating and has very creepy parts.

4. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

Another all time favorite. Typical gothic fiction complete with mansion, brooding man and young female heroine.

5. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

The book that kindled my love for Agatha Christie and scared the pants off 13 year old me.

6. 1984 by George Orwell

The paranoia in this book makes it terrifying. Definitely enjoyed this.

7. In a Closed Room by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Nothing at all like her other works (which I love). This one has ghosts and children. Spooky and sad.

8. The Mysteries of Udolpho by Anne Radcliffe

I am still reading this one but definitely worthy of being on this list.

9. Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

You can’t get much more gothic and suspenseful than this book. A worthy classic that I loved.

10. Gothic Tales by Elizabeth Gaskell

I am currently reading and enjoying so far. This is a collection of shorter stories that are all creepy in a different way.

So that’s it. I decided to keep this shorter because I could have kept going on and on. If you have any creepy classics you think I should try please recommend them to me!

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My Agatha Christie Collection

I have enjoyed Agatha Christie since my middle school days. Call it a fondness if you will (or maybe an obsession).

Ever since I was 13 years old and my school’s summer reading list included And Then There Were None. I remember clearly when my mom handed me $10 and I walked to a little used bookshop in New York and asked for any title off my list. I remember the elderly shop owner who asked me what kind of books I liked (I was into Goosebumps and the Boxcar Children at the time). He said “ah, you like mysteries so why not try this one” as he handed me an old copy of And Then There Were None. I was intrigued and with my $8 change I was able to get myself some snacks (yayyy) and I rushed home to read my new book. I couldn’t have planned it better because that evening there was a thunder storm and I settled in with my snacks and started reading. My friend called me to come over and I remember telling her I was grounded. I wasn’t. I was engrossed in my new book. I was creeped out and terrified. I was hooked.

Very few books hold such vivid memories for me but reading And Then There Were None was a milestone in my reading life. It was my first experience with an adult mystery book and I loved it. When I looked on the inside cover and saw how many other books she had written I was thrilled. Of her 80 something works I have now read 75 of them. I am not sure if it’s nostalgia, a love of cozy mysteries, or the quality of the books but these are books I have come back to again and again. Whenever I’m in a reading rut I can always pick up an A.C. and I’m all better. I think she had such an understanding of human nature and it reflects in the genius of her mysteries.

Fast forward 20 years and I’ve acquired a few of her books. When I started collecting her books, I had mainly used mass market paperback versions of her books and I still have quite a few of them. But when I saw these William Morrow Harper Collins versions, I decided to start slowly collecting them.

They are a very nice size and feel great in my hand but I don’t think I can bring myself to get rid of my older books.

I also recently acquired this beautiful leather bound version of Murder on the Orient Express.

These endpapers are just the greatest.

My shelf stats are as follows:

Print copies: 40

E-book: 1

Standalones: 5

Ms. Marples: 7

Hercule Poirots: 29

Spin-offs: 2

So there’s my modest collection. Eventually I will own all of her books and short stories. And while it will probably always be a mismatched collection, I couldn’t care less. I love them all.

If you are a fan of Agatha Christie, feel free to check out my post on Project Poirot (a reading project I saw on booktube) as I read through all of her Poirot books in order.

Thank you so much for stopping by!

Project Poirot

Some time around September I was binge watching booktube and came across a new book tuber who had just started what she called Project Poirot. Even if you are not an avid Agatha Christie fan, you will probably have heard of her most famous detective- Hercule Poirot.  Now I happen to be one of those who love Agatha Christie and in the last 20 or so years since I discovered Agatha Christie (holy shit I’m getting old) I have read all of her Hercule Poirot books and most of the short stories at some point.  When I am in a reading slump I often pick up one of my favorite of these and it gets me right back in the reading mood.

What intrigued me about Project Poirot is that we are reading all 40 ish (there’s 40ish depending on whether you consider the play adaptations novels or not) IN ORDER over the course of a year.  Not only does this play into my borderline obsession with Hercule Poirot, it is also fascinating to see how her writing evolved over the course of her career and how Poirot himself evolved as a character.  Taking it a step further, one of the things I also find fascinating was to see how the quality of her writing changed before and after (what is largely considered to be her masterpiece) The Murder on the Orient Express.

The list of books that I’m going through is:

  1. The Mysterious Affair at Styles
  2. Murder on the Links
  3. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (considered by some to be her masterpiece)
  4. The Big Four
  5. The Mystery of the Blue Train
  6. Peril at End House
  7. Lord Edgware Dies
  8. Murder in Mesopotamia
  9. Murder on the Orient Express
  10. Three Act Tragedy
  11. Death in the Clouds
  12. The ABC Murders
  13. Dumb Witness
  14. Cards on the Table
  15. Death on the Nile
  16. Appointment with Death
  17. Hercule Poirot’s Christmas
  18. One Two Buckle My Shoe
  19. Sad Cypress
  20. Evil Under the Sun
  21. Five Little Pigs
  22. The Hollow
  23. Taken at the Flood
  24. Mrs Mcginty’s Dead
  25. After the Funeral
  26. Hickory Dickory Dock
  27. Dead Man’s Folly
  28. Cat Among the Pigeons
  29. The Clocks
  30. Third Girl
  31. Halloween Party
  32. Elephants Can Remember
  33. Curtain

I joined this challenge a little late and was a couple books behind and then I caught up but I am now behind again as I am missing the next book in succession and haven’t been able to find it at the libraries near me.  So I will be purchasing that book along with a couple of others.  This has been a really enjoyable challenge and I enjoy how Mara creates a video for each book she completes.

If there are any fellow Christie fans out there reading this, what do you think about this challenge?