Summer Reading Programs

While looking for a way to keep my 11 year old son reading during summer break, I came across a couple Summer Reading Programs that I thought I’d share.

1. Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge

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This program allows your kids to track the books they read, get book recommendations and earn digital prizes. This year’s theme is “A magical summer of reading”.

However, it should be noted that this program also requires that they be registered by a teacher or librarian.

 

2. Barnes and Noble Summer Reading Program

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I really like this one for two reasons.  The first being that they can earn a free book, and the second is that it requires that they log their thoughts about what they read.  They read 8 books, log what their favorite parts are and turn in their log for a free book at Barnes and Noble.  Yes for free books!!

 

3. Lifeway 2018 Summer Reading Quest

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Sadly I do not think we are able to participate in this one because we no longer live near a Lifeway (though I still get the emails)  This program allows your kids to earn a free book AND a free bible.  They will also provide them with the program journal to log their books, plus a bookmark and pencil for free!

 

I came across quite a few more programs but I was very impressed by these three in particular.  The others that I looked into didn’t really seem to have any incentive or at the very least, not one that would interest my son.  Well, that is all for today. Thank you for joining me! Happy reading!

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A Dr Seuss birthday

It’s been two weeks since my last post and there has been a lot going on but we managed to include some bookish activities and lots of reading in that time frame. We started off with Read Across America Day, my birthday, Bella’s birthday, a milestone in 1000 Books Before Kindergarten and culminating today with my wedding anniversary.

It is no secret that Dr Seuss is well loved in our home so for Read Across America Day we went to a Dr Seuss celebration at our local bookstore and got some prizes and books for Bella. (My birthday was also spent at the bookstore where I purchased some books I will haul soon) It was also Isabella’s 2nd birthday and as her favorite story of all time is the Cat in the Hat, we celebrated Dr Seuss style.

I had some blue poster board and thought it would be fun to try and recreate her favorite book’s cover as a prop for her birthday.

I was also able to make a centerpiece with some pictures I printed off the internet and some pages out of her first copy of the book which she destroyed as a baby.

She absolutely refused to get into her party dress but loved the little Cat in the Hat hair clip I made so at least there’s that.

The party was a success and as we asked for books in lieu of cards, she received a nice new stack of books to add to her collection and all signed by people who love her.

Now that most of the festivities are over I will be back with some review posts and discussion posts. Thank you for joining us for our fun Dr Seuss parties. Happy reading!

Warning labels on books: A controversial discussion

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I’d been intending to discuss this topic in a future post and had been holding off due to the fact that some may consider it a bit controversial, but I came across a great post at Pages Unbound and it addressed a lot of the same topic.  So while it is fresh in my mind, I’d like to throw in my humble two cents.

If you are a reader of middle grade or young adult fiction, it will come as no surprise to you that these books, YA in particular, are featuring more and more mature content. And that’s great. Readers can find all kinds of stories to suit all tastes.

But here is my dilemma.

While I would never want to be Nazi book mom, and call for removing books from libraries or angrily snatch books from my kids’ hands, I struggle with how I should handle these kinds of books in regards to my oldest who is soon to be 11 years old. When I was his age I was reading Judy Blume books and the Boxcar children. He on the other hand has a lot more to choose from. I encourage reading in our household and I know he is capable of reading at a level beyond middle grade books… but I don’t necessarily feel comfortable with him reading about things like rape just yet. After all, though he’s almost 11, he is quite naive in regards to a lot of things. His reading level may be advancing quickly but he is still a little boy who thinks the word “butt” is funny. Not quite ready to fully understand things like sex trafficking and torture. Now I know the simple answer would be to just monitor what he reads, but that becomes a little difficult when I don’t know the content of every single book that’s out there and he is fast approaching the “target age” for most YA.

I recently read an article where college students at several different colleges had called for “trigger warning” labels to be placed on books that dealt with distressing content. And while I admit I was sort of dismissive of the idea, it has gotten me thinking. Would it be feasible for publishers to publish future books with a small label? Something along the lines of “contains graphic violence” or “contains sexual content”. I’m curious to know what other readers think of this.

Now my dilemma may resolve itself. I may just be worried about nothing. He may decide “ewww this book is weird” and decide not to read it of his own accord until he is ready (or ever). In which case I will have another few years before I deal with the same issue again with my daughter. I know that for myself, I was around 12 when I started looking for more mature things to read. And I found them. I turned out okay, but I also think I was a little more mature and more prepared to handle difficult content than my son is now.

So I am curious to know what other readers and other parents think?  How do you handle mature content in books with your kids, siblings, students etc?

You force your toddler to read?? In which Nicky rants… just a bit.

Not very long ago, someone said to me “Wow, she really DOES love books” (referring to my daughter Isabella) and I thought to myself “WTF did you think I was lying?”

For Christmas several of our relatives and friends asked what shows and tv characters she’s into so they could buy gifts and I was honestly stumped. She has never been interested in tv and to date has never sat through any toddler tv show (sometimes I envy those parents who can put The Wiggles on tv and sneak away to take a shower or make dinner). I suggested dogs (because she fangirls at any dogs she sees) and books. The response was a little depressing. I heard everything from “I don’t want to get her books…. I want to get something she’ll play with” to “You can’t give her books for Christmas!” And this really upset me because I know my children (nobody commented that I didn’t suggest books for Junior… it was only Bella) and I know that books are the one thing you can’t go wrong with her.

I know that while Junior is a casual reader, Bella is likely going to be a reader like me.

Not that I or any parent should have to explain ourselves but this is not me forcing books down the child’s throat. She is literally fascinated by stories and the pictures in her books. So I thought I would finish out with several reasons why I think she is going to be a reader so I can direct any more well meaning people to this post instead of wasting my breath.

  1. She loves the quality time during story time
  2. She sees that it is my main form of entertainment and she tries to emulate me
  3. Even when someone is not reading to her, she will often be sitting in her room flipping pages
  4. She sits through a whole story…and wants more
  5. She’s fascinated by bookshelves and is always pulling my books off my shelves and hers off hers
  6. She is not exposed to much television because only my son is really into tv
  7. While I am cooking she will usually bring me a book and command me to sit down and read it to her

Now by no means am I saying books are better or that my kid is some genius because she likes books. And I’m not saying that she doesn’t also play. I’m just trying to point out that it IS possible for kids to prefer books.

Oh and we received a ridiculous amount of toys from both sides of the family. I am so thankful we have family who are able to send anything at all but I can’t help thinking how much unnecessary money was spent. Only my dad and my husband’s stepmom followed my advice and sent only books while a couple of others sent books in lieu of cards which I suggested later. And while she occasionally will rock on her rocking horse or pretend to make food in her kitchen, a lot of the other toys sit largely neglected (and taking up space) and the ones she plays with religiously are the books she got. This just goes to show that parents always know their kids best.

If you have read to the end of my rant, I thank you. This was a lot rantier than I wanted it to be. Til next time.